Thursday, March 08, 2007

Sabbatical: we all need time off

I am taking some time off to rest. I am exhausted from the trial, and quite honestly, still wiped out from the elections. I need to rest. It's not forever but I need to not do this for a while. But who knows, being bipolar, I'm sufficiently volatile that "a while" might only be a short time.

Looking around pretty much everybody who was involved with the trial is beyond operating on fumes and close to the edge. We have given our all and everyone now needs a rest.

The heading on this blog: "Lead. Follow. Support. Teach. Learn." I don't see any permission there to rest and reflect. Maybe that's part of the learning, or providing one's own support.

Thanks for your love, support, and much needed prayers for everyone involved with Plamehouse.

*******

4 comments:

egregious said...

I have nothing more, but perhaps you do. Welcome.

lolo said...

egregious,
Please take the time you need to rest and recharge your batteries. You have done so much to help make all this possible. I remember looking forward to your posts when you were in Russia. It was so exciting going to the map at the site meter at fdl and seeing that dot in Russia knowing it was you. I know it sounds so corny but it is true. Just knowing that you were so busy with the children but yet spending your spare precious time to log on and let us know you were ok met so much to all of us. Please take care of yourself. We will be waiting for you to jump back in the lake, when you are ready. See you then ....lolo

egregious said...

Apparently my sabbatical is over. I felt called to contribute to an fdl post today on charities, which is a field in which I have some expertise.

Enough rest.

Back to work.

NZ Expat said...

Hi Egreg!

I'm back in the world of phones and tv's and internet. Good to hear about the verdict, very, very good. It is amazing to see the cranked up noise machine championing Libby, though. I keep wanting them to say that if it is okay for Libby, then it will be okay for some Democrat.

The walk was hard (71 km wasn't bad, but there were some killer steep hills) but absolutely worth it. It took us four days. Go ahead and google Queen Charlotte Walk or Track and you'll see some of the views we had.

One great thing about this kind of travel is that so many people get more open as they travel. While the walk wasn't too populated, we walked, on occasion, with others and met more at our nightly stops. So it was that we made temporary friends with retired Canadian diplomats, Swiss, German, and Brit doctors, an Irish engineer, an East Indian banker, Kiwi farmers, etc. etc. A gracious assortment of trekkers.