Saturday, December 22, 2007

My Gift to You: The Word "Yet"




Here is my Christmas gift to you guys:

The word *yet*

“I can’t do that” becomes “I can’t do that…yet”

“We don’t have the answers” turns into “We don’t have the answers…yet”

Whatever your tradition, you can tap into the message of hope for the future. Believe in something better, and take the first tiny steps in that direction. Amazing things can happen.

*******

Lovely photo taken by PhillipC, flickr creative commons

7 comments:

barbara said...

You know what? This really is a gift, Egregious. Something to remember at those times (and we all have them, I suspect) when we have hit the metaphorical wall. When we have little or no sense (hope?) that there's anything on the other side. I'm more inclined to invoke four-letter words at that point, but I gotta tell you, the "yet" is probably more powerful. Thanks.

egregious said...

Thank you barbara, much appreciated.

Marge said...

What a positive word. And then, going in the opposite direction, there is the word "still," the bane of conversation with old people. "Are you still driving?" "Do you still cook?" "Can you still walk 2 miles?" "Do you still have to take care of that big house?" "Are you still able to climb stairs?"
It's all downhill. I like the more hopeful view that "yet" offers.

sunny said...

Thank you very much eg. That helps- more than you can know. And Marge's observation about still is an excellent reminder.

egregious, you are a gifted communicator.

egregious said...

Marge---excellent observation about the word "still." Will have to give that some thought.

It can be used as kind of an opposite way of framing the same concept:

I still haven't cleaned my desk.
I haven't cleaned my desk yet.

Which is more hopeful?

egregious said...

Sunny,

Thank you for your words of encouragement, much appreciated.

NeoLotus said...

"Beyond Hope" by Derrick Jensen (http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/170/) is a very good read. I came by from an article posted at www.carolynbaker.net. Personally, I'm less interested in having "hope" than I am in finding a means to act.